Holy Cross Today

House of worship, prayer and meeting

Holy Cross's recent history has been one of strengthening and rebuilding our long established foundations while simultaneously broadening our perspectives to remain resilient to the ever-changing social and economic issues impacting our world and community. As a result, parish needs and resources have introduced changes to both our buildings and our ministries.

Our Facilities

In 1982, the former vicars’ house was demolished and a modern parish hall erected, which today includes meeting space for large and small groups from the parish and community, classrooms, fully licensed food service and recreation.
Our parish hallOur parish hallHoly Cross considers this building one of its major assets in ministry to the North East area and is eager to share it with service or fellowship organisations which need space for their activities. 

The parish has spent the past 5 years repairing and rebuilding much of the outside and inside of the church and parish hall. These renovations include a new roof, kitchen appliances, carpeting/flooring, paint and wallpaper, insulation, lighting, woodwork.

Alcoholics Anonymous, the AARP, Relay for Life and similar groups have used our facilities, and they are always on offer. Our church is also available to members of other Christian denominations as a site for weddings.

For more information about Holy Cross facility usage or policies, please contact us or call our offices at: 814-725-4679.

Ourselves

While the renovation of our buildings has been significant for us, far more significant has been the re-making of our parish’s self-understanding, modes of operation and expectations, which is the only thing that made the building projects possible.

In the reorganization made After worship social gatheringAfter worship social gatheringnecessary by a series of resignations, our Bishop’s Committee adopted an entirely new way of doing business: we begin each meeting with prayer and study, and all the practical affairs of the congregation are discussed in that context. No votes are taken: we operate entirely by consensus. When we seek new members, our first question is never ‘Whom can we get to do this job?’ Rather we ask potential candidates, ‘Do you feel called to this ministry?’

Today our ‘style’ is informal, eclectic, down-to-earth, come-as-you-are. We cherish the Book of Common Prayer as it shapes and orders our worship; we have no objection whatever to people who like to dress up for worship – and there are several of us who do – but our first commitment is to (as our mission statement says) ‘welcome all in God’s love’, and that’s what we do. It is a telling commentary on our efforts that nearly everyone who comes to us once in search of a church-home comes back again and eventually becomes a member.

You are warmly invited to come, join us for worship, and experience our way of proclaiming Christ’s gospel – in our hospitality to strangers, care for our own and service to God’s world.